Blue’s Point

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Steve Cox returns to Blue’s Point 10 years after his conviction for killing a black man. The prison released him into the custody of old Jim Blue, whose family has owned Blue’s Point and neighboring Freedman’s Town for decades. At the same time, black magazine writer Mykeisha “Mike” Ali rides into town, planning to expose Blue’s Point as a cesspool of racism where the Klan and skinheads run rampant, threatening (and sometimes killing) black people.

Both Steve and Mike, however, may be a hindrance to a diabolical plot already under way, and there are men willing to resort to murder to keep the two quiet. Ferguson firmly establishes the story’s racial theme. Mike, for instance, is attacked by skinheads simply for stopping to get gas, and it’s abundantly clear that Freedman’s Town is a community for the blacks unwelcome in Blue’s Point. Ferguson fortunately allows the theme to enhance the novel rather than drive it. Steve, for one, is invested in finding who killed his father, who had been the Klan’s Grand Dragon, and he quickly learns that the murder that sent him to jail may have been a frame job.

Establishing the villains, like the repugnant Tommy Saunder, reveals different levels of racism, some derived from ignorance, some from pure hatred. …Ferguson further augments his tale with drama—e.g., unresolved issues with Steve’s high school football pal, police chief Champ Lee—a hint of romance between Steve and Mike, and a surprising amount of mystery: whoever framed Steve for murder may very well be trying to do it again.

Praise for Blue’s Point:

“Ferguson writes uncompromisingly about the hearts and minds of his characters, never shying from describing ugliness and violence, but not dwelling on it, either. The story flowed like a movie in my mind – I could barely turn the virtual pages on my Kindle fast enough. Richard Ferguson’s novel is both a meditation on what stirs men and women’s souls and a thrill-ride – a rare combination, in my experience.”

“No-holds barred writing and great, complex characters. It pulled me along to the thrilling finish.”

“Very, very well written!”

“Could NOT put it down! Excellent read :)”

“The book sounded intriguing – white guy fresh out of jail for murdering a black man meets angry black reporter in a dangerously racist part of the South – and it totally delivered on its promise.”  

You can pick up your own copy here!

 

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